Your Next Career Step – Anticipate or Fear the “Fork in the Road”?

fork-in-the-road1

Searching for a new job these days can strike fear into anyone and test the confidence they’ve developed. Myriad applicants for on-line positions, lack of responses from inquiries, and the litany of requirements for each position pose a challenge to potential applicants. “Am I the ideal candidate they want? Will I be instantaneously disqualified for missing one or two of the requisite skills?” Jobs that appear to be great to the prospective employee may seem like a distant dream, an oasis in the desert of your career path. Is it really possible to take a fork in the road of your career?

Ideal Candidate

It was May of 2001 when I was laid off from my current employer. This was not the greatest time to be on the job market: post-Y2K economic woes in the world, the terrorist attacks on 9/11, the subsequent stock market crash, and the war on terror. Then the phone rang. I was rather undeveloped in my networking at the time as social media tools like LinkedIn were nowhere to be found and cold-calling people was not a practiced skill. Regardless, I continued to contact colleagues and friends to find that next job. I only wish I had been a bit less cavalier about my career when executive recruiters called when I was working, I really needed them now. Then the phone rang.

A colleague of mine told me about a position that he thought was right up my alley. He heard about it from a fellow employee at our last company. At this point in my career, I was a high-tech engineer/program manager looking to do something similar at my current director level or higher. The position recommended to me was Semiconductor Procurement. The second question I posed to the person who became my VP a few days later was “Why me? I have absolutely no procurement experience!” What would interest them in me taking such a new role with no apparent relevant experience?

Perfect Fit

Like many, my search had been focused on the functional roles I had experience in – engineering management, program management, and product management. It never dawned on me to try such a different profession. Why would anyone consider me even if I tried? I asked the question of my relevance for the position out of genuine interest – how could I possibly be of value to them with no purchasing skills? Two things coalesced to send me down the other fork in the career journey. One, the company and the VP were trying to solve a specific problem for their organization. Two, they decided that procurement skills were secondary to the technology experience. This is where I came in.

Despite some of the difficulties in the job search world cited earlier, it is critically important to keep your mind and eyes wide open. Examine all of your skills and experiences thoroughly. While it may seem that they all converge into one entity – you – there are really multiple possibilities for that same you. As many excellent career coaches implore us all to do, look at what you have accomplished and what problems you have solved. Do not sell yourself short. Then cast a reasonably wide net for your search criteria – you never know when that call will come or a new door will open!

A green freeway sign with the words Stay the Course, and an attached yellow sign with the words Take a Risk

It’s now 13 years since that call came for me. My career in supply chain has been tremendously rewarding and has created opportunities that I did not know existed prior to the new career trajectory. As an executive who has both recruited and been recruited I know that not every company or hiring manager is as flexible as I experienced. However, that should never hold you back. The type of company that is not interested in alternative candidates may very well not be the type of place you want to work anyway.

Stay nimble and keep an open mind so that you can position yourself to anticipate, not fear, a potential fork in the road!

Career Success

ciao…mam

Michael A. Massetti is a supply chain executive who has led, coached, mentored and developed many talented individuals. He was AMD’s executive sponsor for the University of Texas Supply Chain Management Consortium and interacted with students for 5 years. Michael recruited and mentored many graduates into AMD’s organization.

Michael’s LinkedIn Profile

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