6 Bold and Creative Techniques for Supply Chains to Weather a Stormy Market

What would you have done with your supply chain in 2007 if you knew what was about to transpire in 2008/9?

The Institute of Supply Management (ISM) data shows that the US manufacturing index has been below the break-even level for three consecutive months after thirty nine months of growth. Will the trend continue? If so, how long and will it get worse? Is the slowdown in China going to have a significant impact on the rest of the world? It remains to be seen.

It’s déjà vu all over again and perhaps the third time since the turn of the century for the global economy to tread water and decline. How are companies dealing with this? The least mature organizations will wait and just react – it will be ugly. Leaders have begun to orchestrate their entire value chain and make changes now that will provide buffer during the downs and catapult them out when growth resumes. Existing Gartner clients can read: Gartner’s Demand-driven Value Network Maturity Model.

What role should the Chief Supply Chain Officer (CSCO) or head of supply chain undertake to stay ahead of the storm?

 

IBM

The Great Depression of the 1930s presented an “unprecedented economic challenge, and Thomas Watson, Chairman of IBM, met the challenge head on, continuing to invest in people, manufacturing, and technological innovation despite the difficult economic times. Rather than reduce staff, he hired additional employees … – not just salesmen … but engineers too.” (Wikipedia)

The trajectory that IBM had after World War II catapulted them ahead of the rest of the industry. It took many technology disruptions, including one that IBM created themselves, and nearly 50 years for IBM to relinquish its position as the world’s most dominant technology company.

What lesson does this provide for supply chain organizations today? Does the IBM approach to difficult economic times suggest an alternative universe of solutions? Was Thomas Watson the first Mode 2 Jedi?

At Gartner, we use the concept of a bimodal supply chain to distinguish between the daily operations of a business from the more strategic view of the future. “Mode 1” is defined as traditional state of supply chain and the everyday drill of cost reductions, delivery performance improvements, and the usual culprits of operational performance. “Mode 2” is an exploratory state, driven by innovative approaches, changes in the market, growth opportunities, and new models of business that impact supply chains. Watson was clearly in a Mode 2 conviction after the stock market crash. “Damn the torpedoes, full speed ahead!” (Admiral David Farragut). Existing Gartner clients can read: Gartner’s Disrupt or Be Disrupted – Defining the Bimodal Supply Chain.

 

Risk / Reward

Too often we’ve seen dramatically poor forecasts. While forecast accuracy is an interesting concept, when it comes to market dynamics, we have to consider whether we are inclined to bias ourselves more towards the positive and hit the gas pedal when it appears as the sky is the limit. And, do we tend to shrug off downward projections without understanding the real implications of such a laissez-faire attitude? In either case, betting wrong has impacts.

Usually, if we do not appropriately anticipate and prepare for a downward trend, the typical after-the-fact response is the venerable Mode 1 stereotype: cut people, stop all discretionary spending, and slam on the brakes. It’s a no holds-barred knee-jerk response. Who has not been there before?

How would we have dealt with the most recent market collapse in 2008-2009 if we knew in 2007 that it was coming? We only get one attempt at each challenge, what can we learn about the past that can be applied going forward?

 

Think Advanced Maturity and Mode 2! 6 Steps to Success

The typical supply chain response to a downturn is to shut down factories, layoff production workers, cut orders on all suppliers, shut down future-focused improvement activities, etc. This approach impacts the ability to grow in the future.

What if we approached this differently? Does the lesson of IBM in the 1930s offer us a window to view an alternative scheme? Proactive strategies fall into the realm of “an ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure.”

  1. Let’s start with talent. Watson hired well ahead of the curve in the 1930s. While admirable in the 20-20 hindsight view it is not always possible. CSCO’s should approach a potential downturn as an opportunity to retool the organization and to acquire skills that the supply chain knows it will need in the future. Instead of purely reacting to the “cut 10% of the HC” directive from the CFO, have a plan in place to retool the organization.

Downturns usually unleash a wave of excellent talent available to the market. Be prepared to reduce your team by more than the 10% target and then begin the acquisition plan once the dust has settled. The CEO and CFO will applaud the forward-thinking. In their eyes, you will still achieve the cost reduction targets but be in a much better position to accelerate when the upward trajectory resumes.

  1. Do you know where your supply and demand is? If you are a mature organization with strong supply chain analytics capability, you clearly do. If not, you are driving somewhat blind, looking back at what has been accomplished but with no sense of what is coming. Don’t wait to start because it will be too late.

Why not partner up with the IT team immediately and seek out some critical target areas for better information and analytics to support your supply decisions. Regardless of your areas of strength or weakness, diving in now before you are asked to change will put the CSCO in the driver’s seat in advance of any challenges for the typical Mode 1 “cut headcount, shut down factories, etc.” request later on.

  1. Don’t wait until there is no choice and be forced to shut down factories and lay off employees. With a strong S&OP process in hand, CSCO’s can begin to evaluate how to reset manufacturing earlier as signals begin to drop. Instead of all-in reductions in work force after the fact, production shifts can be slowly reduced ahead of time without impacting key performance metrics, especially customer service and cost – as they lead to major exposures in revenue and margin. Existing Gartner clients can read: Gartner’s Hierarchy of Supply Chain Metrics.
  2. What downturn has not been met without asking your supply base to do something? The usual suspects come to mind: take back inventory, delay and cancel purchase orders, extend payment terms, cut prices, and compromise well-nurtured supplier relationships. These are all so typical in their Mode 1 demeanor. We can be much better than that. Key suppliers should be viewed as partners – this changes the entire dynamic when challenges arise.

The CSCO or CPO knows that the suppliers see the same avalanche coming their way. There is no better time to dust off the supplier relationship program and evaluate the entire supply base than beforehand. Who is performing very well (cost, quality, delivery, innovation)? Is it possible to shift more supply to these top-performers, especially in multi-sourced categories now? Have we lived with 3 or more suppliers in certain categories when, in reality, 2 is sufficient? It is very important to consider the myriad options ahead of time than to be stuck with a limited, mode 1 playbook later on.

  1. Risky Business! Yes, there is always the issue of risk with a more consolidated supply base, but what is more important now – cost optimization or overall risk? When we talk about risk-making and decisions, the CSCO must know what she is getting into. By understanding what data and intelligence exist about past downturns, the CSCO and CPO can make informed, low-risk decisions today instead executing a reactive response tomorrow.

Engaging top suppliers early demonstrates the trust and confidence the supply team has and creates enduring goodwill. Mutually advantageous strategies can be developed and called into action at the right time. We may be wrong about the projected situation but one might argue you’ll be better off by taking a Mode 2 approach. It’s only bad risk when you have no data or experience to judge with.

  1. You’re not alone in this – what opportunities are lurking? Take advantage of this and realize there are a number of ways for you to do so. First, you have colleagues in the same impending mess as you. Sharing experience and issues allows you to test ideas and find out from others what is or isn’t working for them. Gartner’s exclusive network of diverse and experienced supply chain executives provides an excellent opportunity to talk to someone who understands. Peer networking continues to be the most sought-after element of a CSCO’s repertoire with Gartner.

Next, look ahead of you in your value chain – you will see are customers in the same predicament. A truly orchestrated supply and value chain means that these upstream conversations already occur naturally and are an important facet of everyday supply chain engagement. Ask them about what they see, what they are considering and, you’ll find ideas to help key parts of your supply chain be ready in a holistic manner.

 

Check your mode, now.

Are you thinking ahead and considering innovative and unique ways to persevere through difficult times working out scenarios of what might be? How will you be prepared to respond? Will you wait before you plan on a response tactic? Or, will you lead the charge and start now – ready to pounce on the opportunities that will present themselves while the rest of the pack gets washed ashore? What knowledge assets do you have at your disposal to test ideas against?

 If you are interested in learning more, please go to Gartner’s Supply Chain page or contact me via LinkedIn.

 

If we don’t learn from our past, we are bound to repeat the same mistakes over again.

Michael Massetti is an Executive Partner with Gartner who really does enjoy being a supply chain professional! Seriously. All opinions are my own.

So, you really enjoy being a supply chain professional? Part 2

Are Demand & Supply Driving Your Supply Chain Crazy?

Let’s face it, supply chain is a fascinating and pressure-filled field. Supply chains deliver the products that customers demand. The concept of a demand-driven supply chain was developed by Gartner (originally by Debra Hofman from AMR Research). It’s a great concept that the entire supply chain be driven by demand. Albeit, what it usually drives is the supply planners crazy. Don’t you wonder sometimes how and why you got into this field?

Through a series of articles and musings, I will share some thoughts through adages, quips, and comics that will look at supply chain with a tongue-in-cheek perspective. I look forward to comments and other perspectives.

This second article will look at the vagaries of demand and the vicissitudes of supply. Future story lines will include supplier management, inventory, supply chain risk, logistics, and managing numbers.

Supply Demand Comic 1 

Demand planning is the art of integrating multiple, independent, and inaccurate signals into one accurate signal.

Demand is the baseline for all things supply. Customers’ desire for a product drives the demand and is the foundation for business volumes. Without demand there is absolutely no need for supply and even less need for supply chain folks.

But, where does the demand signal come from? It’s a question that remains mysterious for supply chain professionals.

Demand planners have a plethora of signals available to them – point-of-sale (POS) data, macro market or economic trends, historic demand accuracy, promotional effects, seasonality, business targets, prior product launches, actual orders, and more. While these are options aplenty, by themselves, none of them are sufficient or accurate.

Shouldn’t demand planners be able to get it right with so many variables available to them?

The reality is that most of these signals are rear-view mirror perspectives. As financial planners say, “past performance may not be indicative of future results.” We all know that if you drive your car by looking solely at the rear-view mirror you will eventually go off of the road. Not a good thing.

While many solutions providers have developed amazing tools and statistical techniques for demand planning, the fundamental problem of keeping demand stable and accurate remains unsolved, at least from the supply planner’s viewpoint.

Could it be that there’s more art to demand planning than anyone wants to acknowledge? So maybe the key is to channel our inner Picasso rather than our inner Newton. Regardless, each cycle, whether weekly, monthly, or otherwise, the demand signal is passed on, like the hot potato it is, to the supply team to work with.

And it’s usually different than the last one submitted. 

Supply Demand Comic 2

Supply planning is the science of delivering that exact signal regardless of how much or often it changes.

The supply planning team has the unenviable job of taking that ever-changing signal and converting it to a very specific plan for their factories to deliver. Reducing the uncertainty in the ability to deliver the products required is of utmost importance.

Supply planners are evaluated on finding the ever elusive perfect balance between the triangle that is forecast accuracy, on-time delivery, and stock levels. What’s your business targets for on-time delivery to your customers? Methinks it is well over 90%. 95%? 98%?

Is that even relevant in this day and age? We’re just being measured on our ability to serve the next link in the demand chain. Want a real headache? Start integrating notions of on-shelf availability one or two levels down the chain.

Factories do not deal with ever-changing requirements very well. Shooting at moving targets is not manufacturing’s core competency. They expect to have clarity and stability to be most productive. Building the same exact products at the same volume every single day keeps factory GMs young, vital, and stress-free.

That’s just not the real world of demand and supply. Enter the necessary evil: Stock.

While the demand may move around a lot, supply has a few tricks up its sleeves to mitigate the variance. Buffer stock of inventory and manufacturing postponement techniques are just two of many tools that the supply side can employ to reduce the effects of demand uncertainty.

Regardless, the never-ending conflict to balance the vagaries of demand with the specificity of supply contributes to the sleep deprivation of supply chain practitioners.

Supply Demand Balance Lever

Balanced supply & demand is a rare event they are actually two mutually exclusive, independent signals that occasionally intersect in time and space.

The assertion remains that demand accuracy is fleeting and changes in the signal are frequent and sometimes severe.

The monthly S&OP was our venue to manage the long-term balance of supply and demand. The cycle commenced with an updated demand signal and the supply team would evaluate inventory, capacity, incoming materials, and any constraints to match supply to the demand.

Imagine a giddy set of supply geeks preparing to tell the CFO, COO, CSO, and other execs that we can support the revenue and demand plan. Yeah, baby!

Then, the sucker punch appears. “Actually, we have changed the demand signal for you to evaluate.” Thud.

I lost count of how many executive S&OP meetings that we would be presenting that seemingly perfectly balanced supply plan with the demand signal from the business when the head of demand would utter that sentence. Are you kidding me?

And you thought that Nadia Comăneci performed miracles on top of that 4” wide padded suede beam!

At a macro level, supply and demand balance is quite achievable. But, we all know that attaining that balance at the micro or SKU level is the Holy Grail of supply planning. In those S&OP meetings, the total supply would easily match the total demand. That said, we’d have a list of angst-inducing shortages accompanied by a list of Little Orphan Annie excess products.

Chasing demand is the never-ending pursuit of supply chain. Sort of like that little puppy going ‘round and ‘round after its tail for minutes on end, only infrequently getting to it.

Balanced SC Metric Chart 001

“Forecast accuracy is the biggest oxymoron in supply chain lexicon.

I’ve often quipped that supply chain personnel typically do not utter the words “forecast” and “accuracy” in the same sentence without including a few other colorful adjectives.

For many, forecast accuracy is seen as the sole responsibility of the demand team. For an organization to truly mature, it needs to be a shared responsibility with marketing, sales and finance. The more the merrier. It may not be more precise, but it does increase the odds of a kumbaya session in the next S&OP meeting.

The numbers tell it all: world class demand planning accuracy is ~80% but you get fired if your supply delivery or manufacturing output accuracy hovers anywhere near 80%.

OK, maybe this stretches it a bit. However, the point is valid. Best-in-class demand planning is typically in the 70% range and supply chains get measured on their ability to reach the “Perfect Order”. I’ve been with companies that have settled for 65% as an “aspirational” target.

What is the cost of poor forecast accuracy? Heck, what’s the cost of 65% forecast accuracy? There are only a few levers available to accommodate a 35% degree of uncertainty – carrying more inventory or reducing service levels are two.

If we take a look at Gartner’s “Hierarchy of Supply Chain Metrics” and modify it ever so slightly, demand accuracy, inventory (instead of supply chain cost), and service level (instead of perfect order) are inextricably linked. If demand accuracy is low, something else has to be traded off. Either you carry more inventory or you risk lower service levels. We all know that both can be detrimental to a business.

No wonder so many of our top-talent supply chain planners moved to the demand side of the business.

ciao…mam

Michael Massetti is a global high-tech supply chain executive who really does enjoy being a supply chain professional! Seriously.

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